April 2016 Blog Posts (9)

You Know It When You See It

When trying to decipher the origins of life, there are many paths to follow. Chemical, physical, and occasionally for some, spiritual. For me, one of the most puzzling questions is what exactly defines life? It is a difficult philosophical question that is nearly unanswerable, and often not useful in studying the actual origins of life, but it is entertaining to postulate the different constraints that we place on what is “alive”. One simple designation is “You know it when you see it”, but…

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Added by Akshay Vijay on April 25, 2016 at 7:00pm — 2 Comments

You Know It When You See It

When trying to decipher the origins of life, there are many paths to follow. Chemical, physical, and occasionally for some, spiritual. For me, one of the most puzzling questions is what exactly defines life? It is a difficult philosophical question that is nearly unanswerable, and often not useful in studying the actual origins of life, but it is entertaining to postulate the different constraints that we place on what is “alive”. One simple designation is “You know it when you see it”, but…

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Added by Akshay Vijay on April 25, 2016 at 7:00pm — No Comments

Dogma and Paradigm Shifts

Considering this week’s discussion on the role of bias and dogma within science, I figured it would be best for me to write my post on the importance of philosophy and hypotheticals in science, especially in a field such as origin of life. This is a subject matter I somewhat understand and hopefully something the rest of might find a tad interesting.

The most prominent thinker is this subject matter, as far as I am concerned, would be Thomas…

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Added by Aidan Orsino on April 25, 2016 at 2:17am — No Comments

Idea: Humans Reproduce through Genetic and Non-Genetic Information

A word to the wise:  This is an incomplete set of ideas, and I welcome criticism and discussion.  After conversing with several individuals, I realized that my ideas were extremely similar to Memetics (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meme).  Instead of focusing on the Memes themselves, I would like to instead incorporate them in a discussion of the human behavior that lead me to independently believe in…

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Added by Brooke Kubby on April 22, 2016 at 11:44pm — 6 Comments

Are machines considered life?

When one imagines the species that is humanity’s closest ally they might think of man’s best friend, the dog, or his ever trusty steed, the horse. It is easy for humans to consider animals as friends; when we reach out to touch another mammal, everything about it, the warmth of the body, the sound of breathing, the reacting glance, exudes an unmistakable aura of life. It’s no surprise that the distinction between life and non-life carries a significant weight in the eyes of humans; after…

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Added by Charles Wen on April 15, 2016 at 11:58pm — 2 Comments

Life Exists !

Life exists.

This might seem like an obvious statement, but it is important when thinking about the nature of how things exist. Things exists as either a natural low energy state (what scientists refer to as the equilibrium state), or as ordered structures generated in response to the approach of low energy states. Essentially, an equilibrium state references the physical arrangement of the matter within a system after enough time has passed for all transformations to occur,…

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Added by Tucker Ely on April 15, 2016 at 1:42pm — 2 Comments

Why is Life so Complicated?

A friend recently mentioned that the most complex phenomena in all of the universe seem to occur roughly on the length scale of humans. What is meant by this is that we have equations governing the universe as a whole and equations governing interactions between subatomic particles, but much of what we see in everyday life can't be captured by a simple equation. The issue at hand is really what is…

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Added by Jake Hanson on April 10, 2016 at 7:24pm — 2 Comments

Challenges in observational science or why eating more cheese won't help you get a PhD

When we think about scientists, most times one of two images come to our minds: either a lonely (and most likely white-haired) man frantically writing equations on a paper, or someone on a lab coat mixing liquids in test tubes. These stereotypes basically correspond to two of the main types of scientists: theorists and experimentalists.

Broadly speaking theorists develop hypothesis that try to explain how the Universe works while experimentalists conduct controlled experiments…

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Added by Alicia Gonzalez on April 8, 2016 at 3:13pm — 2 Comments

What’s the best approach for solving the origin of life?

What’s the best approach for solving the origin of life?

The origin of life is a very tricky question to answer. I say this not because it is a very interdisciplinary science question (that also uses some philosophy), but because it requires a unique thought process. Researchers within this field have to think outside of the box and come up with explanations for a completely unknown process that, as we know of, only happened once, happened an extremely long…

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Added by Stone Hanlon on April 1, 2016 at 4:09pm — 1 Comment

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Using tried and tested methods of constructing habitats from ethnobotanical and ethnozoological useful species for self sustainability on Mars

Posted by Andrew Planet on June 26, 2020 at 8:00am 0 Comments

To maximize crop yields on Mars it would be advantageous to do away with annuals and biannuals by engineering the latter into perennials as standard. Not only would that entail far less work to grow produce as the act of replanting is made obsolete, but per given cultivated area perennials bring forth more food and materials with less demand from the soil than the equivalent of annuals.

Imagine a superfood annual such as lentils engineered into a lentil tree for which there already…

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Free astrobiology webinars for kids, summer 2020

Posted by Julia Brodsky on June 13, 2020 at 12:28pm 0 Comments

This summer, Art of Inquiry hosts free space exploration and astrobiology webinars for middle-school students and their families all over the world.



Here is a list of what was covered so far, as well as an updated schedule of webinars:

The search for life in the Universe, Dr. Alex Tsapin, JPL (retired)

The history of SETI, SETIQuest editor, Larry…

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Radiolysis-powered life

Posted by Andrew Planet on June 11, 2020 at 9:56pm 7 Comments

This paper greatly extends the possibility of what a Goldilocks zone can be.  Its no longer the Goldilocks zone as a single expanse, its the Goldilocks zones for a particular area

https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/pdf/10.1098/rsif.2016.0459

¿Are the Venusian sulphuric acid clouds the by product of long dead anoxogenic photosynthetic organisms?

Posted by Andrew Planet on May 4, 2020 at 2:51pm 2 Comments

I just read the piece at the link below entitled "Study: Life might survive, and thrive, in a hydrogen world."

I'd been thinking on similar lines recently, on different atmospheres with early life, but I was considering anoxogenic bacteria whose byproduct is sulfur instead of molecular oxygen. ¿Had life evolved on Venus could its sulfuric clouds be the signature byproduct of such life with no branches ever evolving to produce the equivalent of Earth's Great…

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Ask your questions here!

Started by Gina Riggio in SAGANet Discussions. Last reply by Subarna Chaki 21 hours ago. 124 Replies

If you are trying to ask a question live during Ask an Astrobiologist, please do so in the main chatroom at the bottom of the screen! You can also ask on twitter…Continue

Have we been looking in the wrong time-frame? Requesting feedback on a recent paper.

Started by Christopher J Reiss in The Cutting-Edge of Astrobiology. Last reply by Greg Bowen Jun 30. 5 Replies

Let me first say Hi to everyone as a new member here!   I hope you are all safe, sound, and not too stir-crazy during this Pandemic.I recently stumbled upon a notion for SETI which seems so simple I…Continue

Interactive Online Astrobiology for 10-12 yr olds

Started by Julia Brodsky in Education and Public Outreach Mar 9. 0 Replies

If your 10-12 yr old child is interested in space science, I would like to invite them to our courses. I am a former science teacher,  mom of three, and a former NASA astronaut instructor. I also…Continue

Tags: school, education, middle, astrobiology, STEM

zahra cell

Started by adam nurjaman in Education and Public Outreach Mar 7. 0 Replies

Hallo apa kabar ? semoga selalu baik2 saja zahra cell adalah blog yang…Continue

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