If you are trying to ask a question live during Ask an Astrobiologist, please do so in the main chatroom at the bottom of the screen! You can also ask on twitter @saganorg using #AskAstrobio.

If the live show is not airing and you have a question for a scientist, ask it right here and we'll get back to you!

Views: 2618

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Please help me out, I'm 50, my Dad is 80 & we are needing some help to resolve our differences please?

- How much do you support the 1999 Rare Earth hypothesis, especially since Kepler changed the hypothesis math by 1000%?
- If there are averaged only 2 planets per galaxy with intelligent life, that's still 4 Trillion planets with intelligent life.
- 4 Trillion is statistically rare in the universe, but who thinks 4 Trillion is a small number to be considered rare?
- 4 Trillion planets with intelligent life is a lot, we're hardly alone, just distant, which seems to be a technological issue that some may have mastered.
- Lastly, doesn't the fact Earth is considered a youngish planet mean other planets with intelligent life would be older & so are much more advanced?

Thank you so much for this opportunity.
Brent :)

Please help me out, I'm 50, my Dad is 80 & we are needing some help to resolve our differences please?

- How much do you support the 1999 Rare Earth hypothesis, especially since Kepler changed the hypothesis math by 1000%?
- If there are averaged only 2 planets per galaxy with intelligent life, that's still 4 Trillion planets with intelligent life.
- 4 Trillion is statistically rare in the universe, but who thinks 4 Trillion is a small number to be considered rare?
- 4 Trillion planets with intelligent life is a lot, we're hardly alone, just distant, which seems to be a technological issue that some may have mastered.
- Lastly, doesn't the fact Earth is considered a youngish planet mean other planets with intelligent life would be older & so are much more advanced?

Thank you so much for this opportunity.
Brent :)

Has anyone read the Rare Earth hypothesis? Google it.

 

Its about what it takes to have intelligent life & what is required, kinda important.

 

Very top experts have agreed with it for 20 years.

 

Anyone in astrobiology or astronomy should know the basics, its quality work.

 

But there are holes in it, because science has advanced since 1999, like Kepler, but much of it still holds solid.

 

Is there anyone that knows about this?

 

Anyone?

 

Brent :)

The Wikipedia page is actually very helpful in understanding the Rare Earth hypothesis:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rare_Earth_hypothesis

 

Its a newer more advanced Drake Equation.

 

Its from 1999, Kepler changed the math dramatically, & there are other new discoveries that may change other parts of the equation.

 

Brent

:)

Is ET among us? Physicist Enrico Fermi famously asked the question "Where are they?" to express his surprise over the absence of any signs for the existence of other intelligent civilizations in the Milky Way Galaxy. It was assumed that with the advent of radio we would be able to listen in or, maybe "eavesdrop" is a better word, to alien conversations. But all we get is the natural noises of the cosmos, as far as ET is concerned its radio silence. SETI has considered some alternatives to radio to account for the lack of detection but the few we can test still reveal nothing. With our existing technology we could detect our Earthly transmission, which covers an enormous bandwidth, to distances of over 1000 light years. Such is the electromagnetic leakage from our planet that betrays our existence to anyone listening. While the Drake equation suggests that there should be hundreds of thousands of advanced civilizations in our galaxy alone none have revealed themselves by any technology we know. It seems to be a paradox. Even if the preponderance of technologically advanced civilizations destroy themselves as soon as they develop the ability to do so there should be some evidence of their existence. So far, nothing. Granted any civilization that possesses the technology that would support interstellar travel, even at sub light speeds, would be expected have many other engineering and scientific marvels at its disposal and these could include communications systems that are undetectable by lesser advanced civilizations. But why bother?

I have been gradually developing a conjecture as to why we appear against all odds to be alone and if I am correct the answer is disturbing in the extreme. There is the very real possibility that as a civilization gains technological and scientific prowess it reaches a point where a discovery is made that changes everything. Some could say that nuclear energy is such a discovery but we have survived that, at least for the time being. No, I suspect that this is something more fundamental than that. If such a discovery exists it is about the very nature of reality its self. Consider this; It has been suggested that the entire cosmos as we see it is a simulation, not unlike that portrayed in the movie "The Matrix". If this were discovered to be the case the impact on civilization would be profound and even basic human motivation would be altered beyond recognition. It is disturbing that some of the more recent discoveries in quantum physics strongly imply that all of what we regard as reality is a massive illusion brought about by the limitations of our own senses. If this is the case what happens when the curtain is pulled back and the truth is revealed? Is this when intelligent creatures step out of the nursery and into the real world? Or is this where sapience dies not with a bang but with a whimper?  This may be the difference between mortals and gods.

 

If we knew a coranal mass ejection was going to impact earth, could we put susceptible electronics in a Farday cage and/or take other protective measures?

Hi good evening, I want to know if there is a kind of database of microorganisms with their charactheristics ( temperature range and tolerance, pressure, radiation tolerance, habitat, aceptor/electron donor used etc), ready to filter a look the species. If something like that exist, it is possible to share the information with me? Im planning a project for a master degree but I need an microorganism of study. Thank you , any help will be welcomed. 

Andres Alfonso

caaz.alfonso@gmail.com

Hello,

I was reading about the discovery of Thermus aquaticus at Yellowstone, and these questions popped into my head. I hope they haven't got obvious answers, that I've failed to realize:)

Why is it that all extremophiles are unicellular? Is it impossible for the rise of multicellularity to take place in extreme environments? What makes it so?

Hi Pritha! These are very fun questions, indeed.

But, first off, one would need to point out that not all extremophiles are unicellular! For instance, tardigrades, the best-known extremophiles for many around the world, are themselves multicellular eukaryotes, even if they are also microscopic animals.

And the term "extremphile" itself is only very relative. We mostly use it when discussing things that are extreme relative to us. While we use the term for things that live in the physical and chemical extremes of life as we know it, we also sometimes use the term for things that just live in extreme environments relative to us, and that's not really fair (especially as we oxygen breathers might also be considered extremophiles relative to the entire realm of life that is poisoned by oxygen). 

As for your second question, we truly don't know yet for sure in which environments multicellular live arose on the Earth. It might actually be the case that more extreme environments drive the selection for multicellularity. So there truly is still a lot more for us to learn about this potential!

Thank you Dr. Graham! This wonderfully answers my questions. I was unaware of the existence of multicellular extremophiles. I'm now wondering if it might be possible for more complex forms of life to thrive in such conditions. Is it probable that after many years of evolution, these tiny tardigrades might have evolved into a more complex organism? I guess what I'm really wondering about, is if it is possible for an earth- like evolutionary path of life to unfold on a planet whose conditions are extreme relative to what we consider favourable.

RSS

Forum

Ask your questions here!

Started by Gina Misra in SAGANet Discussions. Last reply by Pritha Jaipal May 6. 181 Replies

If you are trying to ask a question live during Ask an Astrobiologist, please do so in the main chatroom at the bottom of the screen! You can also ask on twitter @saganorg…Continue

© 2021   Blue Marble Space, a non-profit organization committed to science and science outreach.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service